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CBDFULL Balsam Basic

50ml Basic Balm CBD FULL

CBDFULL Balsam Premium 20ml

20ml Milk thistle Premium Balm CBD FULL

50ml Milk thistle Premium Balm CBD FULL

Delivery Time
ready for dispatch in 2-3 Days

INGREDIENTS:
hemp honey olive oil beeswax and Milk thistle. Manufactured according to a traditional recipe with a full spectrum of ingredients.

€32.40
Incl. 20% VAT
In stock
SKU
CBDFULL-P-B-M-50

50ml CBD FULL Milk thistle Balm

Cannabis extract (according to Paracelsus) honey, olive oil, beeswax and Milk thistle.

CBD FULL balm

For dry and flaky skin. Natural blend of honey, hemp, olive oil and beeswax with antibacterial, refreshing and soothing properties. Improves the original barrier of your skin, ensures long-lasting moisture and protects against extreme weather conditions. Store in a cool and dark area.

It is best to apply balm to damp skin after washing. Then the pores are open and the balm can penetrate deeper into the skin and have a better effect.

More Information
Manufacturer Organic Gardens GmbH
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CBD FULL Balm Basic

Natural cosmetics based on ancient methods

CBD FULL Balm Basic is made from honey, beeswax, olive oil and hemp according to methods of the Mesopotamian[1], Egyptian[2], and Roman[3] healing arts. These ingredients were the main ingredients in the ancient healing arts for thousands of years for skin care and treatment of burns, wounds, and other skin damage.[4]
CBD FULL Balm Basic is high quality natural cosmetics made from honey, beeswax, olive oil and hemp.

 According to research

the balm nourishes the skin, has a regenerating effect in the treatment of various dermatoses, pityriasis versicolor (pityriasis fungus), tinea inguinalis (groin lichen), tinea corporis (ringworm) and tinea faciei [5],boils [6] ,fungal skin infections[7]psoriasis and neurodermatitis [8],eczema and diaper dermatitis [9]. The balm reduces itching and bleeding in hemorrhoids and anal fissures [10]  and seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff.[11]


[1] Geschichte der Wundbehandlung mit Honig, Deutscher Ärzteverlag ZFA Z Allg. Med 2015, 91(4)
[Deutscher Ärzteverlag]

[2] Jones, R. (2009). Honey and healing through the ages. Journal of ApiProduct and ApiMedical Science, 1(1), 1-5.
[International Bee Research Association]

[3] Fratini, F., Cilia, G., Turchi, B., & Felicioli, A. (2016). Beeswax: A minireview of its antimicrobial activity and its application in medicine. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, 9(9), 839-843.
[Science Direct]

[4] Geschichte der Wundbehandlung mit Honig, Deutscher Ärzteverlag ZFA Z Allg. Med 2015, 91(4)
[Deutscher Ärzteverlag]

[5] N.S. Al-Waili An alternative treatment for pityriasis versicolor, tinea cruris, tinea corporis and tinea faciei with topical application of honey, olive oil and beeswax mixture: an open pilot study Complement Ther Med, 12 (2004), pp. 45-47
[sciencedirect]

[6] Kedzia B., Holderna-Kedzia E. The use of beeswax in medicine. [(accessed on 12 July 2019)];Pasieka. 2014 3
pasieka24

[7] Al-Waili NS. An alternative treatment for pityriasis versicolor, tinea cruris, tinea corporis and tinea faciei with topical application of honey, olive oil and beeswax mixture: an open pilot study Complementary Therapies in Medicine Volume 12, Issue 1, March 2004, Pages 45-47
[Science Direct]

[8] Al-Waili NS. Topical application of natural honey, beeswax and olive oil mixture for atopic dermatitis or psoriasis: partially controlled, single-blinded study. Complement Ther Med. 2003;11(4):226-234.
[
PubMed]

[9] Al-Waili NS. Clinical and mycological benefits of topical application of honey, olive oil and beeswax in diaper dermatitis. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2005;11(2):160-163.
[
PubMed]

[10] Al-Waili NS, Saloom KS, Al-Waili TN, Al-Waili AN. The safety and efficacy of a mixture of honey, olive oil, and beeswax for the management of hemorrhoids and anal fissure: a pilot study. ScientificWorldJournal. 2006;6:1998-2005. Published 2006 Feb 2.
[
PubMed]

[11] Mixture of honey, beeswax and olive oil inhibits growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Al-Waili NS Arch Med Res. 2005 Jan-Feb; 36(1):10-3.
[
PubMed]

 Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)

valued since pre-Christian times

Milk thistle has been used for over 2000 years for its regenerative properties, mainly for the treatment of liver diseases and poisoning. Less known is that

Milk thistle also regenerates the skin.

According to recent research, because of its strong antioxidant and regenerative properties, milk thistle can help with many dermatological conditions, skin aging caused by ultraviolet radiation, and skin damage due to environmental toxins.

The effectiveness of milk thistle in skin diseases has been scientifically proven.

inhibits the growth of skin cancer [1] [2],
protects against skin aging caused by ultraviolet radiation[1],
plays an important role in the regeneration of skin injuries caused by chemicals such as mustard gas [3]or radiation, thanks to the antioxidant properties of silibinin, its main active ingredient [2],
protects against genetic alterations caused by environmental toxins and chemical oxidants, leading to the formation of benign tumors that later become malignant
[4] [5]
Almost completely blocks skin swelling or the tissue growths caused by environmental toxins [6]
almost completely stops inflammation and tumor formation caused by toxic chemicals.
[1] [7]
Silibinin protects against tumor formation caused by ultraviolet radiation. [8] In a 25-week study, it inhibited tumor volume by up to 97%.
[9]

Application of silibinin to the skin over an extended period of time is well tolerated and has no adverse health effects.[9]

Milk thistle provides "smart protection" against sunburn:

Silibinin ensures that cells are not genetically altered by exposure to UV-B rays or environmental toxins and that the body has sufficient time to repair damaged cells. [9] [10]
Milk thistle inhibits cell death caused by sunburn [11] [12],while it enhances cell death in skin tumors. The study results suggest that silibinin detects the extent of cell damage caused by UV-B rays and protects against cell death when damage is moderate, while it promotes cell degradation when damage is severe. [12] 

Milk thistle anti-aging for skin.  

A 4-week study of volunteers with aged skin examined a face and eye cream containing milk thistle and vitamin E. The results showed a significant anti-aging effect: facial skin had fewer wrinkles and became more elastic; skin tone and density improved noticeably. [13]


[1] Singh RP, Agarwal R. Flavonoid antioxidant silymarin and skin cancer. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2002;4:655–63.
[PubMed]

[2] Matsumura Y, Ananthaswamy HN. Toxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2004;195:298–308.
[PubMed]

[3]  Balszuweit, F., John, H., Schmidt, A., Kehe, K., Thiermann, H., & Steinritz, D. (2013). Silibinin as a potential therapeutic for sulfur mustard injuries. Chemico-biological interactions, 206(3), 496-504.
[Science Direct]

[4] Singh RP, Agarwal R. SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model. In: Teicher BA, editor. Tumor models in cancer research. Humana Press; Totowa, New Jersey: 2001. pp. 359–80.
[Springer]

[5] Zi X, Mukhtar H, Agarwal R. Novel cancer chemopreventive effects of a flavonoid antioxidant silymarin: inhibition of mRNA expression of an endogenous tumor promoter TNFa. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1997;239:334–9.
[PubMed]

[6] Lahiri-Chatterjee M, Katiyar SK, Mohan RR, et al. A flavonoid antioxidant, silymarin, affords exceptionally high protection against tumor promotion in the SENCAR mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Cancer Res. 1999;59:622–32.
[PubMed]

[7] Zhao J, Sharma Y, Agarwal R. A Flavonoid antioxidant, silymarin, affords significant inhibition against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-caused modulation of antioxidant and inflammatory enzymes, and cyclooxygenase 2 and interlukin-1a expression in SENCAR mouse epidermis: Implications in the prevention of stage I tumor. Mol Carcinog. 1999;26:321–33.
[PubMed]

[8] Katiyar SK, Korman NJ, Mukhtar H, et al. Protective effects of silymarin against photocarcinogenesis in a mouse skin model. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997;89:56–66.
[PubMed]

[9] Mallikarjuna G, Dhanalakshmi S, Singh RP, et al. Silibinin protects against photocarcinogenesis via modulation of cell cycle regulators, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt signaling. Cancer Res. 2004;64:6349–56.
[PubMed]

[10]  Huang LC, Clarkin KC, Wahl GM. Sensitivity and selectivity of the DNA damage sensor responsible for activating p53-dependent G1 arrest. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1996;93:4827–32.
[PMC free article]

[11] Pourzand C, Tyrrell RM. Apoptosis, the role of oxidative stress and the example of solar UV radiation. Photochem Photobiol. 1999;70:380–90.
[ProQuest]

[12] Ziegler A, Jonason AS, Leffell DJ, et al. Sunburn and p53 in the onset of skin cancer. Nature. 1994;372:773–6.
[PubMed]

[13] Hahn, H. J., Jung, H. J., Schrammek-Drusios, M. C., Lee, S. N., Kim, J. H., Kwon, S. B., An, I. S., An, S., & Ahn, K. J. (2016). Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin. Experimental and therapeutic medicine, 12(2), 1171–1176.
[PMC]

 

Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.)

Medicinal plant of the year 2018

Full spectrum hemp preparations support the skin's immune system.

The skin has its own endocannabinoid system that keeps its immune system in balance. Disruptions can lead to skin conditions such as acne, itching, psoriasis, rashes, cancer, etc. The use of full spectrum hemp preparations restores this balance. [1]

Has been used for thousands of years for skin diseases.

In Arabic medicine, hemp oil was traditionally used in the treatment of ear ailments and skin diseases.[2]

In India, the use of hemp began around 1000 B.C., and its antibiotic effects were used for skin infections, for example.[3]

In Eastern Europe, hemp flowers were traditionally mixed with olive oil and used to dress wounds. Hemp oil and flowers were used for rheumatism and jaundice. The Polish botanist Simon Sirenius mentioned hemp resin as a medicine for burns in 1613.[2]

In the 19th century, the use of hemp was widespread in Europe and the United States. Corn plasters, ointments, and rheumatism remedies were made from hemp for topical use.[4]

Research confirms the effects of full-spectrum hemp preparations.

Research confirms that full-spectrum hemp preparations can kick-start the skin's endocannabinoid system. As a result, they provide better protection against environmental factors.

A healthy skin endocannabinoid system is able to inhibit pain and inflammatory responses.[1]

Studies have demonstrated a reduction in itching in various skin conditions such as eczema, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis with the use of cannabinoids.[5]
Cannabinoids have anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects, protecting nerves and reducing itching.[6]
CBD has been found to interact with certain medications and alter their effects. For this reason, you should consult your doctor before starting to use hemp supplements.[7]


[1] Bíró, T., Tóth, B. I., Haskó, G., Paus, R., & Pacher, P. (2009). The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities. Trends Pharmacol Sci, 30(8), 411-420.
PMC

[2] Pisanti, S., & Bifulco, M. (2019). Medical Cannabis: A plural millennial history of an evergreen. Journal of cellular physiology, 234(6), 8342-8351.
PUB MED

[3] Zuardi, A. W. (2006). History of cannabis as a medicine: a review. Brazilian Journal of Psychiatry, 28(2), 153-157.
scielo 

[4] Die Wiederentdeckung der Nutzpflanze Hanf von Jack Herer, Mathias Bröckers, 41. Auflage 2008
Google Books

[5] Avila C, Massick S, Kaffenberger BH, Kwatra SG, Bechtel M. Cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic pruritus: A review. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2020;82(5):1205-1212. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2020.01.036 pubmed

[6] Cannabinoids as Therapeutics, Edited by R. Mechoulam, 2005
springer

[7]  Büechi S: Wirksamkeit von Cannabidiol: Klinische Studien mit Cannabidiol und Cannabidiol-haltigen Extrakten. Schweiz Z Ganzheitsmed 2017;29:367-371. doi: 10.1159/000484886
karger

Raw untreated honey

A wound healing agent with a long tradition

The healing properties of honey are based on the fact that it has antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral effects, maintains a moist wound condition and forms a protective barrier against infections due to its high viscosity.

Honey has been valued since ancient times in many cultures as a remedy for numerous skin diseases as well as for wound healing. The oldest writing, in which honey is mentioned, is an approx. 4000 year old clay tablet of the Sumerians with prescriptions for ointments and medicines [1].

Honey is able to cancel antibiotic resistances.

Honey is increasingly used in the treatment of skin diseases and infected wounds, where conventional pharmaceutical products fail.[2] Honey is also used in the treatment of skin diseases and infected wounds. Thanks to its broad spectrum of phytoncides, honey inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms or has been shown to destroy all previously tested microorganisms, including dreaded antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus in chronic wounds or the yeast Candida albicans.[3] Following the use of honey, infections with previously antibiotic-resistant bacteria can be effectively treated with antibiotics.[4] [5] 

Research:

Honey as a wound dressing

supports healing processes and stimulates the body's immune responses[6] [7], destroys pathogens naturally and is very effective in treating acne, cuts, burns, bruises and wounds with risk of infection[8]. Honey eliminates infection, debridement, suppresses inflammation, minimizes scarring, stimulates angiogenesis, tissue granulation, epithelial growth[9] [10] and relieves pain[11]. Physicians used honey to treat ulcers, burns, fistulas, and boils[12], as well as almost all types of wounds such as abrasion, abscess, amputation, decubitus, burns, chills, burst abdominal wound, cracked nipples, fistulas, diabetic, malignant, leprosy, traumatic, cervical spasm, sickle cell, and septic wounds.[13] [14] Studies in Fournier's gangrene confirm rapid improvement with decreased edema and discharge, faster regeneration and less or no scarring, effective wound debridement, and decrease in mortality[15].

Honey for fungal infections

Honey has antifungal activity against all common dermatophytes[16] [17], inhibits toxin production[18], bacterial infections[19] and is effective in treating seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff [20].

Antiviral activity of honey

Honey is safe and effective against herpes labialis, herpes genitalis[21] and rubella virus[22] compared to aciclovir.[22]
Honey in ophthalmology

Honey is used worldwide to treat various diseases of the eye and surrounding structures such as corneal injuries, conjunctivitis, blepharitis, keratitis, chemical burns, and thermal burns [23] [24].

The application of honey in infectious conjunctivitis reduced the redness, swelling and pus discharge until the complete eradication of the pathogen from the body. [25] [26]


[1] Geschichte der Wundbehandlung mit Honig, Deutscher Ärzteverlag ZFA Z Allg. Med 2015, 91(4)

[Online ZFA]

[2] Mandal MD, Mandal S. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed. 2011;1(2):154-160. doi:10.1016/S2221-1691(11)60016-6
[PMC]

[3] Cooper R. Honey in wound care: antibacterial properties. GMS Krankenhhyg Interdiszip. 2007;2(2):Doc51. Published 2007 Dec 28
[PMC]

[4] McLoone P, Oluwadun A, Warnock M, Fyfe L. Honey: A Therapeutic Agent for Disorders of the Skin. Cent Asian J Glob Health. 2016;5 (1):241. Published 2016 Aug 4.
[PMC]

[5] McLoone P, Warnock M, Fyfe L. Honey: A realistic antimicrobial for disorders of the skin. J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2016;49(2):161-167.
[Science Direct]

[6] Medhi B, Puri A, Upadhyay S, Kaman L. Topical application of honey in the treatment of wound healing: a meta analysis. JK Sci . 2008;10:166–169.
[
jkscience.org]

[7]  Tonks AJ, Cooper RA, Jones KP, Blair S, Parton J, Tonks A. Honey stimulates inflammatory cytokine production from monocytes. Cytokine. 2003;21:242–247.
[
PubMed]

[8] Dr. S. Mladenov, The Preservative Effect of Honey, Pchelarstvo Magazine, issue 12, 1967
[honeypedia]

[9] Comparison of the antibacterial activity of honey from different provenance against bacteria usually isolated from skin wounds. Basualdo C, Sgroy V, Finola MS, Marioli JM Vet Microbiol. 2007 Oct 6; 124(3-4):375-81.
[
PubMed]

[10] Medhi B, Puri A, Upadhyay S, Kaman L. Topical application of honey in the treatment of wound healing: a meta analysis. JK Sci . 2008;10:166–169.
[
jkscience]

[11] Topical application of honey in treatment of burns. Subrahmanyam M Br J Surg. 1991 Apr; 78(4):497-8.
[
PubMed]

[12] Honey-a remedy rediscovered and its therapeutic utility. Bansal V, Medhi B, Pandhi P Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ). 2005 Jul-Sep; 3(3):305-9.
[
PubMed]

[13] Clinical observations on the wound healing properties of honey. Efem SE Br J Surg. 1988 Jul; 75(7):679-81.
[
PubMed]

[14] Mixture of honey, beeswax and olive oil inhibits growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Al-Waili NS Arch Med Res. 2005 Jan-Feb; 36(1):10-3.
[
PubMed]

[15] Predisposing factors and treatment outcome in Fournier's gangrene. Analysis of 28 cases. Gürdal M, Yücebas E, Tekin A, Beysel M, Aslan R, Sengör F Urol Int. 2003; 70(4):286-90.
[
PubMed]

[16] Sampath Kumar KP, Bhowmik D, Chiranjib , Biswajit , Chandira MR. Medicinal uses and health benefits of Honey: An overview. J Chem Pharm Res . 2010;2:385–395.
[
jocpr]

[17] . Brady NF, Molan PC, Harfoot CG. The sensitivity of dermatophytes to the antimicrobial activity of manuka honey and other honey. J Pharm Sci. 1997;2:1–3.
[
Wiley Online Library]

[18] Effect of honey on antibody production against thymus-dependent and thymus-independent antigens in primary and secondary immune responses. Al-Waili NS, Haq A J Med Food. 2004 Winter; 7(4):491-4.
[
PubMed]

[19] Honey--a remedy rediscovered and its therapeutic utility. Bansal V, Medhi B, Pandhi P Kathmandu Univ Med J (KUMJ). 2005 Jul-Sep; 3(3):305-9.
[
PubMed]

[20] Therapeutic and prophylactic effects of crude honey on chronic seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff. Al-Waili NS Eur J Med Res. 2001 Jul 30; 6(7):306-8.
[
PubMed]

[21] Investigating the antimicrobial activity of natural honey and its effects on the pathogenic bacterial infections of surgical wounds and conjunctiva. Al-Waili NS J Med Food. 2004 Summer; 7(2):210-22.
[
PubMed]

[22] Effect of honey on antibody production against thymus-dependent and thymus-independent antigens in primary and secondary immune responses. Al-Waili NS, Haq AJ Med Food. 2004 Winter; 7(4):491-4.
[
PubMed]

[23] Therapeutic uses of honey and honeybee larvae in central Burkina Faso. Meda A, Lamien CE, Millogo J, Romito M, Nacoulma OG J Ethnopharmacol. 2004 Nov; 95(1):103-7.
[
PubMed]

[24] Traditional medicine in oman: its role in ophthalmology. Shenoy R, Bialasiewicz A, Khandekar R, Al Barwani B, Al Belushi H Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol. 2009 Apr; 16(2):92-6.
[
PubMed]

[25] In-vitro evaluation of the anticandidiasis activity of honey distillate (HY-1) compared with that of some antimycotic agents. Obaseiki-Ebor EE, Afonya TC J Pharm Pharmacol. 1984 Apr; 36(4):283-4.
[
PubMed]

[26] Investigating the antimicrobial activity of natural honey and its effects on the pathogenic bacterial infections of surgical wounds and conjunctiva. Al-Waili NS J Med Food. 2004 Summer; 7(2):210-22.
[
PubMed]

Raw beeswax (Cera flava)

Beeswax has a long tradition as an ingredient in creams and ointments, and has been used by humans for health care since the Neolithic period.[1]

In ancient Egypt
beeswax was used for medicinal purposes. In many recipes, it was the main ingredient of creams and ointments for the treatment of wounds, burns, and pain.[2] [3]

In traditional Indian medicine.
beeswax is used for abrasions and burns[4] and has also been effective for cracked heels.[5]

Physicians in ancient Rome
used ointments made of olive oil , beeswax and rose water to treat burns, wounds, cuts, bruises and fractures [6].

Beeswax makes the balm supple and increases adhesion to the skin protects the skin from moisture loss and external influences such as cold or sun. It is breathable and does not clog pores. In skin care, beeswax has antibacterial[7] and anti-inflammatory effects.[8] It has fat-like properties without being greasy and is readily absorbed. The contained vitamin A supports the skin in the formation of new cells and delays collagen degradation and thus the aging of the skin[9]. Beeswax has a strong synergistic effect, absorbs the active ingredients of the other ingredients and slowly and continuously releases them to the skin, increasing the effect.


[1] Bernardini, F., Tuniz, C., Coppa, A., Mancini, L., Dreossi, D., Eichert, D., ... & Hua, Q. (2012). Beeswax as dental filling on a Neolithic human tooth. Plos one, 7(9), e44904.
[PLOS ONE]

[2] Papyrus Ebers”
[
medizinische-papyri]

[3] Fratini, F., Cilia, G., Turchi, B., & Felicioli, A. (2016). Beeswax: A minireview of its antimicrobial activity and its application in medicine. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, 9(9), 839-843.
[Science Direct]

[4] Datta, H. S., Mitra, S. K., & Patwardhan, B. (2011). Wound healing activity of topical application forms based on ayurveda. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2011.
[Science Direct]

[5] Sarojini B. A comparative clinical study on Shala Niryasa and Madhuchishtha in the management of Padadari. Int Ayurvedic Med J 2013;1:1-7
[IAMJ]

[6] R. Chauvin Traite' de biologie de l'abeille Masson et Cie, Paris (1968)
[books.google]

[7] Weston, R. J. (2000). The contribution of catalase and other natural products to the antibacterial activity of honey: a review. Food chemistry, 71(2), 235-239.
[Science Direct]

[8] Ravelo, Y., Molina, V., Carbajal, D., Fernández, L., Fernández, J. C., Arruzazabala, M. L., & Más, R. (2011). Evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of D-002 (beeswax alcohols). Journal of natural medicines, 65(2), 330-335.
[Springer]

[9] Kurek-Górecka, A.; Górecki, M.; Rzepecka-Stojko, A.; Balwierz, R.; Stojko, J. Bee Products in Dermatology and Skin Care. Molecules 2020, 25, 556.
[MDPI]

Olive oil (oleum oliva)

Used for skin care since ancient times

The use of olive oil can be traced back to the Bronze Age (ca. 3150 to 1200 BC). It was used for rituals such as anointing kings and for skin care.[1] Cleopatra is said to have invented the first anti-wrinkle cream containing olive oil.[2]
The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of olive oil have been used in wound care since ancient times and are still used in folk medicine today.[3]

Olive oil protects the skin in combination with honey, beeswax and hemp.

The mixture of honey, beeswax, hemp and olive oil, prepared according to traditional methods, has been proven for a long time because the different ingredients work synergistically with each other.[4]
Research on olive oil shows:

Olive oil is rich in vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which stabilize cells. Vitamin E protects against UV radiation, prevents the development of cancer cells and repairs skin damage [2]. It delays skin aging and has a positive effect on skin hydration.[5]

Research has shown

that the application of olive oil to the skin is effective in treating dry skin, eczema, inflammation, itching, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, diaper dermatitis, burns, and other skin damage.[6] The antibacterial effect of olive oil significantly improves foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes.[7] Olive oil nourishes and protects the skin, promotes the healing of wounds [3], moisturizes and enhances the absorption of other ingredients. [8]


[1] Vossen, P. (2007). Olive oil: history, production, and characteristics of the world's classic oils. HortScience, 42(5), 1093-1100.
[
ASHS]

[2] Viola, P., & Viola, M. (2009). Virgin olive oil as a fundamental nutritional component and skin protector. Clinics in Dermatology, 27, 159-165.
[
PubMed] Pdf

[3] Gümüs, K., & Yurttas, M. A Different Utilization Area of Olive Oil: Wound Care.
[
Juniper Publishers]

[4] Bogdanov, S. (2016). Beeswax: History, Uses and Trade. Online Beeswax Book.
researchgate

[5] Möller, H., Nsmann, A., & Wallat, S. (1989). Wirkungen von Vitamin E auf die Haut bei topischer Anwendung. Lipid/Fett, 91(8), 295-305.
[
Wiley Online Library]

[6] Baumann, L., & Weisberg, E. (2010). Olive oil in botanical cosmeceuticals. In Olives and Olive Oil in Health and Disease Prevention (pp. 1117-1124). Academic Press.
[
Science Direct]

[7] Nasiri, M., Fayazi, S., Jahani, S., Yazdanpanah, L., & Haghighizadeh, M. H. (2015). The effect of topical olive oil on the healing of foot ulcer in patients with type 2 diabetes: a double-blind randomized clinical trial study in Iran. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, 14(1), 38.
[
Springer]

[8] Viljoen JM, Cowley A, du Preez J, Gerber M, du Plessis J. Penetration enhancing effects of selected natural oils utilized in topical dosage forms. Drug Dev Ind Pharm. 2015;41(12):2045-2054.
[
PubMed]